The deal of a lifetime

When it comes to making a clean break Ian Usher’s effort will take some beating. The 44 year old ex-pat now living in Perth has put his entire life up for sale on eBay, and plans to jump on the first available flight out of Oz with the proceeds.

And in putting his ‘entire life’ up for grabs, the rug salesman from Darlington County Durham isn’t holding anything back. The successful bidder will not only take possession of the car, jet-ski, bodyboards, motorbike, house and hottub, but will also get access to Ian’s friends, and the chance to take on his carpet sales job.

Ian is making the move after splitting from his wife of five years. He writes on his website, www.alife4sale.com: "I have a great life. I live in a nice house in a beautiful area of a fantastic city…but everything in my home is a reminder of the wonderful past my wife and I shared."

Selling your worldly possessions – and even your friends – is one way to get yourself out of difficulty. But Sun Money wouldn’t recommend Ian’s plan to everyone.

For those of you carrying burdens of a more financial nature rolling all your debts into one may be the best option.

Consolidate to accumulate

Balancing a whole raft of different debts can be time consuming as well as tricky to manage. A consolidation loan, one that pays off all other outstanding debts, can help organise your finances and get you back in the black.

Consolidation loans are bound to be bigger than your other debts, but you’ll generally be able to pay them back over a longer period.

What’s more, interest rates on large loans tend to be lower than those on smaller ones. If you’re currently struggling with credit cards and overdrafts you’re almost bound to pay a lower rate if you consolidate those debts. Which means repaying a lower amount each month and actually having more money to spend.

Click on MoneyExpert.com’s Debt Consolidation Calculator to see what you can save.

Bank and building societies, as well as some specialist firms offer loans for up to £25,000 which you can repay over periods as long as seven years.

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